Monday Links – Russia loves Raymond, nobody loves cannibalism edition

Exporting Raymond movie posterThis week’s links round-up starts with a snicker before getting into the heavy stuff.

“And then, the Russians called…”Global Post
The creator of Everyone Loves Raymond is invited to make a Russian version of the show. Of course he makes a video about it. Of course you should watch it.

Muscovite Lives, Entangled in HistoryNew York Times
A new documentary looks at the lives of the last Soviet generation.

Exploring the ‘Bloodlands’Boston Globe
Gal Beckerman reviews Timothy Snyder’s new book, Bloodlands: Europe Between Hitler and Stalin. The “bloodlands” are those countries in eastern Europe which were overrun by the Soviets and the Nazis, with the same end result all around—millions of dead citizens. Snyder insists that Hitler and Stalin must be viewed together to properly understand the 20th century; Beckerman’s review cogently argues that Snyder is onto something here.

Stalin’s Cannibals – Slate.com
Another review of Badlands. Warning, this one opens with the words “How much should the cannibalism count?” and the gross-out factor grows from there.

Speaking of… Cannibals Seeking Same: A Visit To The Online World Of Flesh-Eaters – The Awl
After reading about the horrors inflicted by Stalin and the depths to which people were forced to sink, it is disconcerting to read about the same activities but now with “kinky” and “first amendment rights” and “consensual” attached in place of “genocide” and “hell” and “mass murder.”

And finally, from Stalin to Hitler: Ukraine opens its KGB archives to Yad Vashem uncovering the stories of entire families that had completely disappeared from any records, while in Macedonia, a new Holocaust museum opens. Tablet looks at what it takes to become a tour guide in Auschwitz, and the New York Times asks whether we need more Holocaust museums, and how they can evolve as survivors die and it recedes into history.